Sunday, 15 September 2019 06:26 GMT
img

Using artificial intelligence to locate lost pets




(MENAFN - Asia Times) Have you ever been worried about a pet that went missing in a big city? The chances of finding that pet are daunting, to say the least.

Now, think of a society where uploading a single photo could help identify your dog.

Recently, a private Chinese company launched a so-called "dog-face recognition" platform offering those possibilities, CGTN.com reported.

As every human has distinct fingerprints, every dog has unique identifiable features on their noses. The program developers hope that a few photos taken of the dog's faces will help to confirm their identity.

MEGVII is a Chinese artificial intelligence company with eight-years of human facial recognition experience. They are now applying similar technology to dogs, the report said.

On their PET ID platform, owners can register their pets via smartphone, filling in their information and uploading pictures of their dogs' noses.

The "facial recognition" technology will read and record features of each dog and help to build a profile for each dog.

"Compared to chip injection, our method is easier, cheaper and safer," said Li Guang, Senior Researcher of MEGVII.

The technology can also identify and authenticate dogs by comparing information of photos from different dogs, the report said.

This approach can help find lost dogs and notify pet owners when their dogs are in trouble.

"In the past, when we tried to find lost dogs, we used manpower. It wasn't accurate at all. Now, the AI technology is empowering human beings with the ability to differentiate between different dogs. The accuracy can be as high as 95 percent," Li said.

Data shows that 99 million Chinese households own one or several pets in 2018.

Building a database for pets and owners is only a small step before China establishes a complete registration system for the booming market. This technology however cannot exist without government participation or society's engagement.

"In first-tier and second-tier cities, especially, local governments' attitude towards companion animals has improved considerably," said Shi Jingyu, Deputy Secretary-General of China Small Animal Protection Association.

"It's not only because they have to deal with stray dogs and pet disputes, but they're also becoming more aware that the city's attitude towards pets reflects the reputation of the city. We hope a solid registration mechanism can be soon established."

The company also says that they are planning to expand this technology to identify other types of pets.


Sign up for the Daily Report

Every weekday, receive a selection of Asia Times' best stories.

Sign Up

MENAFN1108201901590000ID1098871655


Using artificial intelligence to locate lost pets

Authors_Square_PromoteArticle_Ink2019

  Most popular stories  

Day | Week | Month