Jackal Falls Into A 40-Ft-Deep Open Borewell In Agra, Rescue...| MENAFN.COM

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Jackal Falls Into A 40-Ft-Deep Open Borewell In Agra, Rescued


(MENAFN- IANS)

Agra, Nov 14 (IANS) A male golden jackal was rescued by the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit after it was found trapped in a 40-foot-deep open borewell in Karbhana village located in Tajganj, Agra.

After a thorough onsite medical examination, the animal was deemed fit and released into its natural habitat.

The Wildlife SOS team also rescued a seven-foot-long Indian rock python from the Agra Golf Course and a six-foot-long python from the Civil Airport premises located inside the Air Force Station in Agra.

On Sunday morning, farmers heading out for the day's work heard a cry emanating from an open borewell in Karbhana village and upon investigating further, they found a young jackal huddled in its depths. Concerned for the animal's well-being, they reached out to the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit on its 24x7 emergency helpline (+91-9917109666) for aid.

A two-member team geared with necessary rescue equipment and medical aid was immediately dispatched by the NGO. After an hour-long rescue operation, the jackal was safely extricated from the borewell and after a quick onsite medical examination, it was released back into its natural habitat.

Golden jackals are native to the Indian subcontinent and play a very important role in forest ecology. They are omnivorous in nature and feed on a variety of small mammals, birds, fish, hares and even fruits. Unfortunately, golden jackals are frequent victims of hunting, wildlife trafficking, man-animal conflict and highway accidents etc. This species is protected under Schedule II of the Wildlife Protection Act 1972 and has an estimated population of 80,000 in the wild.

Kartick Satyanarayan, Co-founder & CEO of Wildlife SOS, said, 'Uncovered wells and borewells pose a huge risk not only to wildlife but also to people's safety. It is necessary to cover these wells and borewells, especially the ones that are at the periphery of human habitation. We are extremely grateful to people for reaching out to Wildlife SOS in times of aid, as we can ensure safety for all involved.'

The team also rescued a seven-foot-long Indian rock python from the Agra Golf Course which is located behind the Taj Mahal West Gate. Initially spotted near the rest house, the reptile later slithered into the garden.

In another incident, a six-foot-long python was sighted in the store room near the parking area at Agra Civil Airport located inside the Air Force Station. The python was safely rescued by the Wildlife SOS Rapid Response Unit.

Baiju Raj M.V., Director, Conservation Projects, said, 'Rescuing a wild animal requires lots of expertise and trained professionals. Wildlife SOS rescuers are professionally trained and able to deal with varied forms of wildlife emergencies.'

--IANS

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